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Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2

Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2

Joaquín Achúcarro (Piano);

"Achúcarro’s approach is unorthodox in today’s stick-to-theletter-of-the-score, mechanically perfect musical world. His rubati seem excessive to some; to others, like a throwback to a Golden Age. For all of his reverence for the great composers whose music he plays, he maintains a healthy sense of their humanity as well. “Our duty is first of all to understand what composer does and wants, and then to try to deliver it the best we can, but also to serve the music,” he says. “And maybe sometimes the composer is wrong.” He adds, “People say you must follow the text. But if you follow the text, perhaps the music is not totally served.”...And he views what he does as a performer as an act of creation in its own right." (The Washington Post)

Dun: Paper Concerto

Dun: Paper Concerto

Haruka Fujii (Paper Percussion);

"Musically tightened, the non-narrative concerto has become a magical ceremony…Paper Concerto makes a fine companion piece to his Water Concerto." (The Los Angeles Times)

Dun: Water Concerto

Dun: Water Concerto

David Cossin (Water Percussion);

"This work was one of the most astonishing pieces of music that I’ve ever heard." (The Australian)

Mozart: Martha Argerich plays Mozart live from Tokyo

Mozart: Martha Argerich plays Mozart live from Tokyo

Martha Argerich (Piano); Renaud Capuçon (Violin); Gautier Capuçon (Cello); Paul Gulda (Piano); Rico Gulda (Piano);

"...the visceral thrill of the playing of Martha Argerich, the elusive pianist and cult favourite, certainly merited the eager anticipation that her appearances always generate." (The New York Times)

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons

Julia Fischer (Violin);

"It seems rather appropriate that, as with LP and CD, one of the first really outstanding DVDs of The Four Seasons should come from the Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields, this time directed and led vivaciously by Kenneth Sillito, and with a brilliant young soloist in Julia Fischer. She plays with remarkable freshness, obviously inspiring the Academy players also to give of their very best. The result is remarkably spontaneous, and one feels one is hearing this baroque masterpiece anew." (The Penguin Guide)